Section 2 Of Part 2: Could IgA and IgG Antibody Mediated Reactions To Foods Cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Or Lou Gehrig’s Disease?

March 10, 2011 · Filed Under ALS 

This is section 2 of part 2 (of a 5 part series). In this section of part 2, we will discuss how IgA and IgG mediated reactions to foods could cause ALS symptoms. 

There are five classes of antibodies that are present in our bodies, IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG and IgM. With a gluten intolerance, IgA and IgG mediated antibody reactions are responsible for autoimmune related tissue damage. Initially, the antibodies react to gluten and then cross react with other areas of the body leading to a variety of symptoms.

Naturopathic doctors recognize that we can also have IgA and IgG mediated reactions to other foods as well (not just gluten). Like gluten intolerance, the tissue damage can occur throughout the body with many possible symptoms. There are blood tests available to test for this type of reaction, however, many people are unaware that this is available and it often isn’t promoted by medical doctors or allergists who usually only believe in IgE mediated reactions to foods. I’m not sure why many in the medical field hold on to this belief that antibody reactions to foods can only be IgE mediated. To me, it seems reasonable to suspect that IgA and IgG mediated reactions can occur against other foods as well, just like it does in a gluten intolerance. Perhaps, the lack of awareness about gluten intolerance (only approx. 3-5% are diagnosed) contributes to this belief. Once everyone with a gluten intolerance is diagnosed, likely everyone will realize that  other antibodies can react to food, just like the IgE antibodies.

With this in mind, if IgA and IgG antibodies can react against gluten and cause an autoimmune response and disease, then why couldn’t IgA and IgG mediated reactions against other foods cause an autoimmune response and disease process. Perhaps, a gluten intolerance does cause ALS symptoms in some people. In others, reactions against other foods may be responsible. As well, some may have both a gluten intolerance and other reactions to foods. I think people with ALS should consider this possibility and that researchers should do clinical trials looking at this possible association. ALS patients do not have a lot of time to spare. 

Testing for IgE mediated reactions to foods may be helpful as well.

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The rest of Part 2, along with parts, 3, 4, and 5 will follow in the next 2-3 months.

5 Part Series

Part 2 Of 5 Part ALS Series: How Could A Gluten Intolerance Cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Or Lou Gehrig’s Disease? (see 8 sections of Part 2 below)

Section 1 of Part 2: How Could Antibody Reactions Against Transglutaminases Contribute To ALS

Section 2 of Part 2: Could IgA and IgG Mediated reactions To Foods Contribute To ALS Symptoms

Section 3 of Part 2: Could Glutamic Acid And Aspartic Acid Contribute To ALS Symptoms

Section 4 of Part 2: Abnormal Neurological Findings With A Gluten Intolerance

Section 5 of Part 2: Can Nutrient Deficiencies Contribute And How is This Associated With A Gluten intolerance?

Section 6 of Part 2: Are There studies Showing An Association Between Gluten And ALS?

Part 3 Of 5 Part Series: How Could A Gluten Intolerance Cause ALS In Various Age Groups

Part 4 Of 5 Part Series: How could A Lectin Intolerance Contribute To ALS

Part 5 Of 5 Part Series: Some Final Thoughts About ALS And Gluten

Comments

3 Responses to “Section 2 Of Part 2: Could IgA and IgG Antibody Mediated Reactions To Foods Cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Or Lou Gehrig’s Disease?”

  1. Donna Kenselaar on March 10th, 2011 5:51 pm

    Hi
    I just finished being tested for celiac disease. I had the genetic testing done as I have been gluten free for 7 years. The test came back negative. The GI specialist told me that what did come back in the tests is that I have a IgA deficiency. The specialist was very kind to me but she told me that there was nothing she could do for me. My gluten intolerance is severe, plus I have problems with others foods. Do you cover these topics in your book. Thank you for your time. Donna

  2. Shelly on March 10th, 2011 9:15 pm

    Donna,

    Yes, my book does cover these topics in the chapter about diagnostic tests:)

    Best regards,
    Shelly Stuart

  3. Tracy on March 11th, 2011 12:16 pm

    Donna, Shelley’s book is so comprehensive and includes many citations to medical studies. It would be a useful resource to take to a doctor who wanted to help but did not know how.
    Where do you live? Finding a support group of other people coping with gluten intolerance can be very helpful and offer good networking to medical practitioners who can help you.
    ~Tracy

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